Wednesday, July 25, 2007

Realtors drop a doozy

I am not sure I want to seriously analyze the results to this latest poll, not only because many of the questions are severely loaded, but also because in many cases they are factually incorrect. They start the survey by framing the issue completely inaccurately:

Q3. There is a current debate ongoing in the North Carolina Legislature about placing a one-percent sales tax on all real estate transactions in the state. The tax would be paid for by the seller of the property. For example, if you owned a $200,000 home, you would pay a $2,000 tax to the government at the closing. Do you strongly support, somewhat support, somewhat oppose or strongly oppose a real estate transfer tax.

There is no debate about a one percent tax; it is only .4 percent or $800 on a $200,000 home. And it wouldn’t be on all real estate transactions in the state. It would only be in counties that first approved the new tax in a county-wide referendum.

Q4. In North Carolina, the Legislature reported earlier this year a $1.3 billion budget surplus, yet, there are talks ongoing in the General Assembly that would create a new tax on real estate transactions. With surplus money, the state should NOT increase taxes because when it comes to taxes my family has hit the limit. Do you strongly support, somewhat support, somewhat oppose or strongly oppose a real estate transfer tax?

Any revenue from a transfer tax would go to the county budgets, not the state budget so the surplus doesn’t apply. And whether or not there really is a surplus is a matter of contention. Same goes for Q10.

The loaded wording continues for the duration. See for yourself.

If there ever were transfer tax referenda in North Carolina counties, Public Policy Polling will provide quality, unbiased polling of their success or failure. See our work on the Wake County School Bond. In the meantime, I don’t think Q13 is worth the paper it’s printed on.

2 comments:

truth detector said...

Those who live in glass houses should not cast the first stone.

gregflynn said...

Any comment on the fact that that respondents were mostly older than 60 and mostly in small town and rural areas? Is that typical?

 
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